Too Good To Be Forgotten 80s

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Some people may not look forward to Sunday evening, knowing that the start to the working week is not far away. For me, 7 o’clock on a Sunday evening is the start of two hours of music from my favourite decade, accompanied by online conversations with some of the loveliest 80s enthusiasts you could ever hope to encounter. I am referring to Matthew Rudd’s “Forgotten 80s” show on Absolute 80s, which is also repeated on Thursdays from 9 to 11pm.

During the show, fellow 80s enthusiasts communicate via Absolute 80s’ Facebook page, and/or on Twitter, under the hashtag #forgotten80s. Despite Mr. Rudd’s observation that some people do use both platforms, I believe the majority of listeners choose one or the other. This was evident a few weeks ago, when he mentioned how welcoming the Facebook listeners were, but neglected to mention us Tweeps in a similar vein. Suddenly, my Twitter feed was full of comments from the Forgotten 80s Twitterati, protesting at Matthew’s lack of acknowledgement for his loyal tweeters. One notable comment likened the Tweeps to Grange Hill pupils, and those using Facebook to Rodney Bennett! Having never used Facebook during the show, I can’t comment on the second half of that statement, but given the range of characters of my fellow Tweeps, I reckon the Grange Hill tag is pretty accurate, and one which we should wear with pride. We have that same sense of camaraderie and banter, there is lots of fun, and everyone has an opinion (and isn’t afraid to share it!).

Of course, you can always listen to the show without any social media interaction, as I did when I first started listening. However, I wouldn’t be without Twitter now, when tuning in. There is nothing quite like sharing memories and trivia with other fans of the decade that subtlety forgot, inspired by a fantastic soundtrack of the era. Even when the music isn’t to my taste (Karel Fialka’s “Hey Matthew” springs to mind), it is still a vibrant blast from the past, which I wholeheartedly embrace. So, come join us and, as Wham! once sang “let me take you to the place where membership’s a smiling face” ūüôā

Paraskevidekatriaphobia!

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Take your mind off today’s¬†date by downloading “My Eighties” for¬†free¬†today from Amazon. Don’t worry if you haven’t got a Kindle. Simply download the¬†free app, to read Kindle books on¬†your tablet, mobile or computer.

My Eighties Cover

 

What better way to spend Friday 13th than reading about the decade that subtlety forgot? If only tomorrow was going to be so easy to get through. It’s going to be exhausting opening all those Valentine’s cards that will drop through my letterbox!!

 

Welcome To The House Of Ska…

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Nearly a year ago, I wrote about my newly-found regard for tribute acts, inspired by a Complete Madness gig. Since then, I have seen the Yorkshire-based Madness tribute band play a few times, and with each performance has come an elevated appreciation of their talents. Having seen a number of other tribute acts during the past year, including an unlikely looking One Direction (more like Wrong Direction!), and an Olly Murs who reappeared later in the show as Bruno Mars, I still believe that Complete Madness are one of the highest calibre tribute acts you will encounter.

Comprising of¬†founding members Mark Keegan (lead vocals) and Derek Wood (guitar), alongside Dave Potter (keyboards), Jeff Thompson (drums),¬†and relative new boy, Tom Regan (saxophone), one of thOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAe main reasons they achieve such a high standard is that the band emulate rather than¬†imitate,¬†ensuring that each show is indeed a tribute to the original Nutty¬†Boys.¬†Where it is not uncommon for some tribute artists to¬†sing along to a digitally-enhanced backing track, usually whilst performing a dodgy dance routine, Complete Madness are musicians who play live. As for¬†dodgy dance routines? The only dodgy thing you’ll find when they are on stage is Derek’s knee!

With this in mind, you can imagine my excitement when they agreed to perform at my House of Ska evening (see below for details) on 9th May, in Ashford, Kent. Maintaining the high quality of music throughout the evening, Complete Madness will be supported by my favourite local¬†band, Skatacus. Based in Kent, they are a seven piece band which plays a broad mix of covers, from traditional Ska numbers through to popular Two-Tone classics. They also perform their own original material, such as “Ska Wars” and “Let’s Skank”, written by guitarist, Neil Hughes. Led by Mark Chappell (drums/vocals), the band also features Paul Friend (keyboards), Justin Homewood (bass), and a powerful¬†brass section, in the form of Delia Hazrati (saxophone), Jon Hone (trumpet) and Alex Oliver (trombone). If that’s not enough to make you want to channel your inner rude boy or girl, there is also a strong possibility that a special guest or two may make an appearance!

Located in the centre of Ashford, Revelation St. Mary’s is an10003927_755288591157691_454993643_n functioning church, which has also operated as a music and arts venue since 2011. Playing host to a wide variety of artists, from The Orb (pictured) to Courtney Pine, Toploader to The Lightning Seeds, Revelation St. Mary’s offers not only a unique quirkiness but, with nearby parking (free after 6pm), and Ashford International Station a short walk away, it is ideally situated too.

Tickets are on sale now, available online or from the outlets shown below. We look forward to seeing you there!

House of Ska poster