Girls (and boys) On Film

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The last 7 days have been filled with carrying out and transcribing interviews for the next book. I have had the pleasure of chatting to Modern Romance’s Andy Kyriacou, Punk poet and former Stone Roses’ manager Garry Johnson, and producer Kevin Porée, who recently worked with Gary Barlow on Paul Young’s contribution to the Fly album, ‘People Like You’. With some more great interviews lined up this weekend, I  almost forgot to mention another project with which I am involved.

Madam Popoff Vintage in Margate and I are collaborating on an 80’s photoshoot in the seaside town next month. If you, or someone you know, are aged between 16 and 25, and would like to take part in the shoot on 5th April, then send us a photo via social media or email: admin@my-eighties.co.uk, and we’ll be in touch. Thanks!

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Down To Margate

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As a teenager, I loved going to Margate. Half an hour’s train ride from my home town of Faversham, the summer holidays would see me at the seaside town as often as I could. Long, sunny days spent at Dreamland (or Bembom Brothers, as it became during the 80s), an ice cream on the sandy beach, and buying cheap sunglasses and t-shirts from the souvenir shops in Arlington Square are forever etched in my memory.

Margate may have changed in the last three decades, but with the renovation and re-opening of Dreamland last year, some fantastic artwork on display at the Turner Contemporary (Grayson Perry’s ‘Provincial Punk’ exhibition last summer was incredible), and an ever-expanding Vintage Quarter to peruse, that change is for the better.

I have been invited to attend a Retro Event at one of the vintage stores thriving in this area of Margate, and will be signing copies of ‘Your Eighties’ from 2-4pm at Madam Popoff, on Saturday 30th April.

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However, I plan to be there most of the day to meet the celebrity guests who will making appearances throughout the day. I am also looking forward to meeting up with my fellow New Haven Publishing author, Garry Johnson, who will be signing copies of his book ‘Punk Rock Stories and Tabloid Tales’, and with Bob Bradbury from Glam Rock band Hello, who will be signing copies of his first solo CD album ‘Mad Affair’. Full guest list and timings will be announced nearer to the event, but it plans to be a fabulous afternoon for anyone with an interest in all things retro and vintage, with clothes and accessories from the 1940s onwards available for purchase.

Entry is free, so come along and join in the fun – I look forward to seeing you there!

Present Company Exceptional

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10931387_1606116766284382_2832285792610681723_nMy Nan would always tell me that “you’re judged by the company you keep”. If that is the case, I’m quite happy for you to don your wig and gown. Having joined New Haven Publishing this week, for a two book deal, I am in very good company.

Specialising in music and entertainment industry publications, New Haven, boasts Ginger Coyote’s “The Best of Punk Globe Magazine”, Greg Healey’s “Decade of Discontent, The 1970s – Now And Then” and Nick Welsh’s “The Life & Times of A Ska Man” amongst its titles. My fellow authors also include actor Gary Shail (who may be best known for his role in Quadrophenia, but will always be Steve from Metal Mickey to me!) and ‘Punk Poet’ and ex-Stone Roses manager, Garry Johnson. In addition to his memoir, “Punk Rock Stories And Tabloid Tales”, Garry has also collaborated with Swedish singer/songwriter Sören ‘Sulo’ Karlsson, on a CD of the same name. Due for release on 26th February, the album showcases both talents, with Sulo’s distinctSuloive vocals delivering Garry’s lyrical poetry. I have been fortunate enough to have a sneak preview of a couple of the tracks. The beautifully regretful “The One That Got Away” was all it took before I found myself pre-ordering the CD.

At the helm of New Haven Publishing is Norwegian born Teddie Dahlin. An author and music journalist, Teddie was the interpreter for The Sex Pistols when their 1977 tour reached Norway. Her first book, “A Vicious Love Story: Remembering The Real Sid Vicious” is an account of that time. With an aim to “strive to grow steadily, making our name  synonymous with good quality reading”, Teddie leads by example, one which I will enjoy following when writing my next two books on Eighties’ pop culture. After all, I don’t want to be Bad Company – that’s so Seventies!